Agenda Overview

January 23, 2017
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

 
 

Building the Foundation for Reimagining Communities

The day’s focus on big trends and civic innovations in impact investing, workforce, and community development start and end with people. How do we create more widely shared opportunity and ensure that communities have the skills and talent needed to thrive? It begins with our youth. Connie Yowell, CEO of Collective Shift, which connects people and organizations to catalyze social change, will lay out a vision for how we can tackle these interconnected challenges. One of Collective Shift’s first endeavors is the launch of a social enterprise that works collaboratively with schools, businesses, cities, and community institutions, such as libraries and museums, to redesign learning for the 21st century so all youth have the opportunity to succeed. 


SESSION

Our Region's Future, in a National Context

The morning plenary session will consider the Dallas Fort Worth region’s economic future based on an in-depth study conducted by the Institute for the Future.  National experts will respond and discuss national trends and how those are impacting not only the DFW region but many other regions around the country. The panel will also consider how DFW compares in relation to other growing markets.      


INNOVATIONS IN FINANCE: A Primer on IMPACT INVESTING and PAY FOR SUCCESS

What are the latest trends in the growing field of impact investing? This session will draw on some of the latest research and feature several examples of impact investor efforts that are moving the needle on pressing community needs around the country. Participants will leave the session with a deeper understanding of the current state of play and promising growth areas for different approaches such as Pay for Success models.  

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BRIDGING THE DATA AND PRACTICE DIVIDE:  HELPING CIVIC AND BUSINESS LEADERS MAKE BETTER USE OF Data and EVIDENCE IN DECISION-MAKING

Policymakers rightly emphasize their desire to make evidence-based decisions and act on the latest research and data, whether that relates to affordable housing, workforce policies or a host of other issues. Yet, there often remain significant gaps between what the research says, and how that can be translated and applied by local governments and other stakeholders facing a host of resource and implementation constraints. This session will explore efforts to bridge this divide. How are researchers and other thought leaders addressing the challenge of making their work more actionable and relevant for cities and communities? What are cities and local partners doing to innovate in this area and up their game in being able to integrate evidence and data in decision-making and program implementation?  


PLENARY LUNCH:  CIVIC INNOVATION AND THE RISE OF THE SHARING ECONOMY    

Eighty percent of Americans live in cities and that number is increasing, accompanied by profound demographic shifts in the population. With these trends, the way we work and earn money, where we stay, and how we get around are all changing.  This session will explore the opportunities and innovations occurring in US cities in light of the rise of the sharing, informal gig economies.  How are cities partnering with companies like Uber and Air BnB? What are the potential benefits and downsides for neighborhood revitalization efforts and other place-based initiatives? Planning and transportation policy? How are other companies adapting to the on-demand economy? What does all of this mean for the next generation of workers and young entrepreneurs?      

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INNOVATIONS IN PLACE-MAKING AND NEIGHBORHOOD REVITALIZATION

There is a consensus among community development experts and many policymakers that addressing deeply inter-connected needs holistically is a winning strategy for creating communities and neighborhoods of opportunity. Often, however, it is easier said than done to implement private-public partnerships that simultaneously address issues ranging from affordable housing, quality schools, economic opportunity and public safety, not to mention strengthening cultural and other community assets and amenities. This session will examine recent successes and ongoing challenges in a number of neighborhood revitalization efforts unfolding around the country and internationally.


Rebooting workforce through social enterprise, small business and closing the skills gap

Traditional workforce models have evolved to meet the changing employment landscape and meet communities where they are. This session will more deeply consider innovations, new initiatives and new partnerships focused on creating great jobs and developing talent for those jobs. What are the best new efforts underway to develop skills and make sure that everyone gets a shot at a quality job? Where are the most promising partnerships taking place? How are businesses, especially small anchor businesses in neighborhoods of opportunity, growing to meet employment demand? With evolving and expanding tech economies around the country, how are we filling those jobs as well as jobs in other evolving sectors?     

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Peer to Peer Exchange Among Cities

In places as diverse as Detroit and London, private and public partners are teaming up to test social innovation models and pursue place-based strategies to help cities evolve, empower communities to build ladders of opportunity, and enable businesses to adapt and play a leading role in growing markets. This plenary finale to the day will feature a discussion among officials and practitioners from three to four cities, who will compare best practices and share insights with the audience.   


January 22, 2017 + 4:00-6:30 p.m.

OPTIONAL LEARNING TOUR

Downtown Plano has seen a revitalization of their historic Downtown to becoming a thriving residential and entertainment hub with their latest residential and retail projects under construction. Downtown Plano is a vibrant community of urban living, performing arts, galleries, event venues, unique shops and restaurants that are independently owned and operated; all set against a backdrop of historic buildings, the Plano Station Dart Rail, and Haggard Park. Over 50,000 square feet of private development, over 1100 urban apartments built or approved framing the live-around footprint, and historic commercial and civic buildings have been restored in the compact 80 acre downtown area. Join this learning tour to see how mass transit, small business, community revitalization and the arts are coming together to create a vibrant downtown for residents and tourist. The learning tour will be followed by a reception and networking discussion.